Skratch for Interior Design and Architectural Facades


Skratch is an ideal medium for creating interior effects!

From the images above you can begin to see the wide range of uses that Skratch can be put to for creating unique and captivating interior design effects and architectural facades.

Skratch has been put to the test in commercial and residential interiors with great success. Future articles on this site will highlight specific projects or design ideas and outline the details to using Skratch for creating similar great results.

 

Jared has always felt that interiors were one of the places that Skratch could find endless creative variety in. Being easy to work with and not much more mess than painting, anyone can be inspired to use Skratch on a project. Using Skratch is a simple choice for anything such as: sculpted wall panels to hang up, mirrors and sculpted frames, adding sculpted details to furniture, wall and ceilings, window and door frames, cabinets, and much more.

3 thoughts on “Skratch for Interior Design and Architectural Facades

  1. just stumbled across your website and am intrigued by the possibilities I see in the examples – wanna check it out – do you have a catalogue?

  2. Hi, I got here by watching a series of youtube videos made by a holiday-window painter named Scot Campbell, who also posted a video about skratch. I had to check it out. It looks and sounds amazing and I can understand your shipping issues. I worked at a kitchen store and glassware was expensive to ship, but necessary. Maybe you can work out a deal with some new business that uses solar-or restaurant grease-powered vehicles! How about someone going around to art stores and doing classes/demos, then selling to the attendees? With at least ten different ways it can be used. Because it’s so new and different.
    My question is this – can it be used to embed things into, like resin? For example, the Huichol Indians of Mexico make amazing embedded bead art. Could glass beads be embedded into skratch and remain tightly embedded when dry?
    Thank you,
    Cynthia in Palo Alto




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